Sci-Fi

14 Oct

I have some interesting ideas for sci-fi writing.  I’ve thought of most of it as a product of sheer curiosity about philosophy and futurism.  After the fact, some concepts happen to look ripe for narrative elaboration.  Most intriguingly, some of it is wild stuff which may actually happen.

Many of the perennial issues in human living are sure to evolve in exotic ways in the future, and this provides ample opportunity for an interesting sort of historical continuity and reference.  That’s standard fare, but what if new philosophy and practice actually changes man’s relation to his situation and even his relation to his past?  There are lots of possibilities.  At the same time, I always place a premium on compelling originality and striking jaunts of the imagination.  What’s more, I expect the future to be very weird — much weirder than the already zany present.  I don’t know how exciting weirdness can be, but it can definitely be memorable.

It’d be interesting to juxtapose very subjective and freakishly impersonal views of the future.  That chasm could open up all sorts of avenues for exploring games egos play and what it actually amounts to versus what people believe they’re accomplishing.

AI holds a lot of promise for sci-fi.  While much sci-fi has involved AI, I think the very act of building an AI will be far more dramatic and transformative than many folks realize.  It’s not just another engineering project.  It’s much more, and there’s a story to tell there.  The challenge is that whoever tells the story might have to know quite a lot about how to actually build an AI.

It’s an exciting prospect!

 

I’m not interested in writing space opera type stuff.  I don’t think the most interesting part of the future is in space exploration or in fighting cardboard cutout bad guys.  There is certainly much room to explore the ongoing development of present tensions between science, religion, and philosophy as they relate to personal identity, purpose, politics, AI, lifestyles, and so on.  What excites me most about the future is how humans and/or posthumans/thingybobs will field a sense of purpose and a very enhanced self-awareness in a decisively scientific and technical age.  Purpose has always been an esoteric thing, but it usually finds ways to pose as exoteric.

While purpose is a perennial topic, the future promises its own unique and very dramatic variations on this age-old matter.

 

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